The power of voice according to Colin Gray

The power of voice according to Colin Gray

Evaldas: So having dealt with the angry staff at the hotel and being a superstar and all, you’re doing a commercial contract to record like one of the famous brand. It’s a commercial of Whiskey’s, and the director comes and speaks around for 40 seconds in Japanese, something — and you have to understand it, but the interpreter just translates it into this one sentence, “Turn and look at the camera.” Anyway, after like 30 seconds of expressive talk, what would be your response to that one?

Colin: I think I would — so there’s certainly a lot of lost translation there, I guess.

Evaldas: Yeah, literally.

Colin: Yes. I think there’s a lot can be — as one of the disadvantage that the people talk about in podcasting is that you can’t see people’s body language, you can’t see their expressiveness. But actually, I think you can get a lot from people’s voice in what they’ve gotten across, and it’s funny how often, when I’ve been abroad that you’re trying to talk to somebody and you know there’s definitely a massive language barrier out there. You pick up a few words, so you can get a clue what they’re talking about, like a translator. They are maybe give across, he would give a general gist to things, but it’s quite often I think that you can still pick up the feeling, the emotion, what sort of background and intentions that a person has, just by the way they speak and the emotion in their voice and locate in some other things. So I think I suppose I speak for a living in some ways, so I can probably just improvise, make up something on it and what the translator told me. I guess the Japanese guy, given that he is using a translator, is probably not going to understand what I say, so I can maybe get away with that living in a fair but…

*Photo Credit: Static1.squarespace.com*

*Photo Credit: Static1.squarespace.com*

Evaldas: Yeah, just try to improvise with whatever you can.

Colin: Indeed.

Evaldas: You’re an actor, so that’s what you do for a living.

Colin: Well yeah, I suppose in some ways.

Evaldas: In that situation, I mean.

Colin: Yeah absolutely. Definitely.

Evaldas: Yeah. In the sense of podcasters and have to like engage with us, so we have to use some kind of people’s skills or communication skills to make the show more appealing to the audience, but we only have one tool, as you said like, our voice.

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About Evaldas Miliauskas

Evaldas Miliauskas is the founder of CastSource – a startup that provides transcriptions designed for podcasts. He is a passionate podcaster listener, host, and a entrepreneur.

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